Lower Back Pain Relief

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I have been practicing for 18 months and have had back pain in the last few months. I feel special when I wake up in the morning. Nothing too serious or painful, but I can feel it.

I’ve started doing a number of lower backs, especially in the morning, which definitely reduces the pain, but does not eliminate it. At the gym, I do hyper-extensions, which also help a lot.
Lower Back Pain Relief
My question is:

Should I do targeted weight loss exercises or will it increase pain and be counterproductive?

What else can I do so that I do not intensify the pain and find a way to relieve it?

Robin Ashe
How often do you lift the load?

Are you actively training your back? For example with Planks and Superman?

What kind of weightlifting are you doing? Maybe you have created an imbalance in your body?

I agree with @ DForck42. Knowing what practice you are doing gives you a better idea of what you may face or exaggerated.

I do weight training 4 times a week. As follows: Monday – chest (bench press, oblique press, dumbbell flies) and back (mostly upper back row, lat pulldowns), Wednesday: shoulders (push, raise) Friday: arm (curls, pushdowns), Saturday: squat, Extension).

Thank you for providing information about your training. I agree with @Informaficker that the best way to deal with back problems is professional expertise. Many people have back pain and many have suggestions about what works for them. However, all back pain is not the same and there are many factors causing it, so treat your condition as unique. At this point, it may be very counterproductive to add a self-weighted exercise. Here’s my suggestion:

1) Find a good coach: Ask the professional to check your form. An improper shape can cause pain and dysfunction. Mistaken over time can progressively cause unbalanced pressure on your joints or cause an acute injury. How to Find a Professional Trainer That Can Fix The Wrong Position and Problem In Your Form While Lifting Iron.

  • Examples of Poor Forms That Can Cause Pain: There are some generalizations that can cause back pain through lifting weights. An improper squat shape, such as leaning too far forward, can filter out the spine and cause back pain. At the stand shoulder press, an example of a bad shape that could hit the back of the bar is that the bar is released too far, so the curved the back. Videos on your form will help you analyze potential problems and help improve your shape. Sometimes it’s much easier to find faults than to feel them.

2) Find a good naturopath/therapist: Since you currently have back pain you can not get rid of, it’s time to see a specialist to investigate the cause, to offend tissue (joints, muscles, fasciae) Treat and instruct specific exercises (stretching and strengthening) to correct the imbalance.

  • Palpate analysis, posture and movement and assessment of your freedom of movement will show whether you have limited joints, muscles and / or fascia. You may be given flexibility training to overcome all the limitations of the stem, chest, hips, and lower extremities.
  • A specific muscle test will identify the vulnerability that needs to be addressed. The best part of seeing a professional is getting knowledge and specific information about what you can do to fix your specific damage. While exercises that emphasize stability are generally good for the back (as seen on our website such as boards, bridges, and dog birds), they may or may not be the key to fixing your back problem.
  • Choosing Practitioners: You will find that all physio therapists, doctors, and other practitioners such as chiropractors, masseuse, and others are not the same. For the treatment, choose a manual therapist specializing in back-care. Or maybe you prefer a sports doctor / doctor who is more familiar with your exercise program, but may not be as good as his treatment. Try to get personal recommendations from those gym people who have been successfully treated.

3) Determine Your Back Routine: Since you have noticed that your back responds to stretching and strengthening exercises, you must respond appropriately if you get the right combination of exercises. In addition to exercise, there are other self-care techniques that you can ask your therapist:

  • Self-massage techniques such as the use of foam rollers, tennis balls or magic balls can also contribute to relaxation.
  • In some rear conditions, traction helps reduce pressure. There is a way to do the attraction yourself, but check with your doctor if it is appropriate for your back.
  • KinesioTape is another helpful self-care technique and your therapist can teach you how to use it.

For information about lower back pain please visit http://twisted-vine.com

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